In addition to a $6 million exhibit of some of the finest known and rare Saint-Gaudens double eagles planned for the Long Beach Coin, Stamp & Collectibles Expo, September 9 to 11, author David Tripp will display a number of truly spectacular items related to artist Augustus Saint-Gaudens and the legendary 1933 double eagles.

Tripp is author of the critically-acclaimed new book, ‘ILLEGAL TENDER: Gold, Greed and the Mystery of the Lost 1933 Double Eagle’ (published by Simon & Schuster), and he will conduct an educational program at 2 p.m. on Thursday, September 9, and meet with the public each day of the show. Among the items he’ll display are:

* Copies of Secret Service reports from the 1944 investigation that led to the confiscation of 1933 double eagles.

* Photographs of all seven 1933 double eagles that are known to have been photographed including three that were subsequently destroyed after confiscation; two in The Smithsonian; the Fenton coin that sold for $7,590,020; and a Mystery Coin described in his new book and recently mentioned in Coin World.

* Several fake (“tribute”) 1933 double eagles.

* Examples of other numismatic work of Augustus Saint-Gaudens including a George Washington 100th anniversary inaugural medal and a Columbian Exposition award medal.

* And, copies of two letters, one — previously unknown and unpublished –written by Saint-Gaudens to his brother that underscored the artist’s disdain for Mint Engraver, Charles Barber (he described Barber as an “S.O.A.B.,” or as we’d abbreviate it today, “SOB.”), and reports that Teddy Roosevelt promised “to cut Barber’s head off if he didn’t do our bidding.” The other letter confirmed that Saint-Gaudens’ widow purchased a 1907 Ultra High Relief for face value, 20 bucks, plus 12 cents for shipping.

The Long Beach Coin, Stamp & Collectibles Expo will be held in the Long Beach, California Convention Center, 100 S. Pine Ave.

Show hours are Thursday – Saturday, September 9 – 11, from 10:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Admission is $6 (good for all three days); $3 for seniors 65 and older and children, ages 8 to 16. (Free admission for children aged seven and younger.)