Sacagawea 2001 Golden Dollar

The U.S. Mint today announced that the new Sacagawea Golden Dollar coin will be available beginning January 27, 2000.

Authorized by the United States Coin Act of 1997, the Golden Dollar will replace the Susan B. Anthony dollar coin. Its most distinctive features include its golden color (a three-layer “clad” system of manganese, brass and copper), wide border, smooth edge, and extraordinary design.

The Golden Dollar can be used immediately in millions of vending machines that currently accept the Susan B. Anthony dollar.

History

Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin accepted the recommendation of the Dollar Coin Advisory Committee that the new dollar coin contain an image representing Sacajawea, the Native American woman whose presence was essential to the success of the Lewis and Clark expedition.

Secretary Rubin established the Dollar Coin Advisory Committee in May to recommend a design concept for the heads (obverse) side of the new dollar coin. The Committee on June 12 made their recommendation to Secretary Rubin that the new dollar coin bear a design of Liberty represented by a Native American woman, inspired by Sacajawea. Sacajawea was the Shoshone Indian tribe guide who in 1804 joined the Lewis and Clark expedition en route from the Ohio River Valley to the Pacific Ocean and back.

The United States Dollar Coin Act of 1997 required the Treasury Department to place into circulation a new dollar coin similar in size to the Susan B. Anthony dollar coin, golden in color with a distinctive edge. The law required the Treasury Secretary, in consultation with Congress, to select the designs for both sides of the new coin, although the design on the tails (reverse) side is required under the statute to depict an eagle. Secretary Rubin determined that the design on the heads (obverse) side should be a representation of one or more women and could not depict a living person.

American sculptor Glenna Goodacre designed the obverse (heads) of the Golden Dollar coin, which features the likeness of Sacagawea, the young Shoshone woman who assisted Lewis and Clark on their exploration of the Louisiana Purchase almost 200 years ago. The reverse (tails) of the coin, by U.S. Mint Sculptor/Engraver Thomas D. Rogers, Sr., features a soaring Bald Eagle and 17 stars, representing the 17 states of the Union at the time of the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

Specifications:

Denomination

Sacagewea Golden Dollar

Obverse Sacagawea and Infant Son
Date of Issue 2000
Designed By Glenna Goodacre
Designer’s Initial GG
Reverse Eagle In Flight
Date of Issue 2000
Designed By Thomas D. Rogers
Composition Manganese-Brass

88.5% Cu
6% Zn
3.5% Mn
2% Ni

Weight 8.1 g
Diameter 1.043 in.
26.5 mm
Thickness 2.00 mm
Edge Plain
No. of Reeds N/A

Coin Information Provided Courtesy The United States Mint.