The Value of Gold in a Era of Paper Assets, Stocks, Bonds and Mutual Funds…

The facts behind the increasing demand for gold and silver, rare coins, and historic collectibles from the U.S. Mint…

No other substance on Earth embodies the unique characteristics of gold. Its yellow luster and beauty are unsurpassed. Since the earliest days of man, it has been admired, molded, shaped, and worn as a symbol of wealth and good taste.

The romance and lure of gold is enhanced by its historic use as a storehouse of wealth. Gold’s value is intrinsic. Its value is a measure of the true wealth and the stability of national currencies the world over. Throughout history, every paper currency has become totally worthless over time; yet gold remains.

The precious metal gold cannot be created or destroyed or altered. It forever remains one of the most liquid investments with no geographic boundaries. Gold is bought, sold, traded, and stored in most parts of the free world with complete privacy. Likewise, U.S. gold coins enjoy many of these unique advantages.

In a world where paper currencies come and go, where paper money can be depreciated 25% to 30% overnight, the price of gold cannot be manipulated by any single nation or borrower. On the contrary, gold is the foundation of today’s world monetary system.

Acquiring U.S. gold coins put you in great company through American history. Prior to 1933, all U.S. paper currency was backed dollar for dollar by gold reserves. Today, paper dollars are backed only by a government promise, nothing more.

For investors who value gold, they recognize the safety, privacy and instant liquidity of U.S. gold coins. As official legal tender, each coin has a guaranteed weight and gold content.

Numismatic coins, especially the pre-1933 U.S. gold coins are highly sought after by astute collectors and investors for more than their pure gold content. The Saint-Gaudens, the Liberty series, and the Indian Head U.S. gold coins are admired and collected worldwide for their historical significance, beauty, and rarity.

Unlike gold that is minted by the tons annually, U.S. Gold coins minted prior to 1933 have a fixed and limited supply. No more will be minted ever and the older they get, the more highly prized they become as important pieces of American history.

We hope your visit will encourage you to add more rare and valuable U.S. gold coins to your collection and to learn how to build sets that will appreciate in value and be greatly admired for many generations to come.

Why You Need To Buy and Sell Gold Coins (Part 2)

How to Collect Rare Coins For Fun and Profit

Time has proven that collectors tend to make the most money in rare coins because they search out “undervalued coins” and buy during market lulls. Buying in today’s market climate offers you superb upside profit potential.

PUT IN PERSPECTIVE – Rare coins have an extremely limited, fixed supply which has historically increased in value when demand overwhelms availability. This fact is documented in the enclosed “Dow-to-Gold Report.” It clearly shows how rare coins go up as well as down in price with varying market cycles. We believe the most successful Rare Coin portfolios were built in down markets by systematically assembling a variety of choice, rare, and desirable coins, with a three to five year, or longer, holding period in mind.

HAVE A PRECISE FOCUS – Thousands of coins have been issued over the past 200 years. Very few collectors are experts on more than a few types of coins. For that reason alone, it’s important to build a relationship with a firm that employs a team of knowledgeable Rare Coin Specialists and Numismatic Experts that are recognized as pillars of authority throughout the industry. Together, we can help you define your areas of interest, your investment goals, and our team of specialists can then guide you to a specific area of U.S. Coins designed to be both profitable and extremely enjoyable.

THE FOUR FACTORS FOR SUCCESS – To profitably build a balanced and diversified Hard Asset Portfolio, you need to know the driving forces behind the U.S. Rare Coin Market:

* STRONG DEMAND – We recommend U.S. Rare Coins that have a broad base of both active investors and collectors. The more wealthy, sophisticated, and avid the base of buyers in an area, the more successful your portfolio should be in the long run.

* SMALL SUPPLY – We recommend U.S. Rare Coins of the highest quality for the date that you can afford. These are always the hardest to find, most desirable collector coins and have historically been top market performers. In our opinion, these coins are always in demand by collectors and will be the easiest coins to liquidate later, and turn the best profits.

* STRONG PERFORMANCE HISTORY – Take the time to review the price history of any rare coin you purchase. Rare coins that have a good history of 200% to 300% price increases during recent bull markets, usually offer your an excellent profit potential in the next hot market. While past performance is no guarantee of future value, undesirable coins are losers in any market. It is of utmost importantance to remember that each rare coin must stand on the value of its own individual merit related to grade, price, eye appeal, and rarity.

* GENUINELY RARE – Finally, we recommend you acquire a selection of Genuinely Rare United States coins. There are fundamentally two ways to determine a coin’s rarity. That is “Condition Rarity” and “Absolute Rarity.” Condition Rarity is a coin that is rare in higher grades. Some coins are common in worn, circulated grades, yet there could be only five coins known to exist in higher mint-state grades of MS-63 to MS-65. Absolute Rarity is a coin that is rare in any grade. These are truly desirable gold coins that are hard to locate and acquire in all grades. These few coins that are Absolutely Rare in any grade are the “Blue Chip Recommendations” of the U.S. Rare Coin Market.

Why You Need To Buy and Sell Gold Coins (Part 3)

Putting Rare Coin Market Cycles to Work for You…

Until recently many people believed U.S. stocks would go up forever.

However, recent crashes in high tech stocks and the overall stock market correction left many investors with huge losses. Clearly, market cycles are changing.

The return of high inflation, combined with a slowing economy, suggests it’s more important than ever to move into safer, more profitable investments in the coming market cycle.

Balance and Diversify Your Portfolio – We believe you can profit handsomely by diversifying your portfolio with investments currently undervalued. Everyone agrees gold, hard assets, and commodities have been out of favor in the past decade. For many reasons, we feel these sectors are most likely to be top performers in the next market cycle.

Move To Hard Assets in Bad Economic Climates – For that reason, it’s important to consider moving into hard assets, gold, and U.S. Rare Coins. Prices are attractively low today compared with past market highs. The table below details recent cycles for the U.S. Rare Coin Market showing increases ranging from 348% to 1,195%.

$1,000 Invested in Rare Coins Worth $57,977 – Collectors Universe researched the U.S. Rare Coin Market carefully based on a study of 3000 Rare Coins. The graph above shows $1,000 invested in rare coins in 1970 would be worth $57,977. The conclusion is that U.S. Rare Coins have produced superior profits over gold bullion or Dow Stocks.

Buy Rare Coins During Market Lulls – Since January of 1970, the U.S. Rare Coin Market has had eight very definitive market cycles. There have been three complete Bull and Bear Market cycles since 1970. To maximize profits, collectors prefer to acquire coins that are currently undervalued. They hold their coins and wait until a Bull Market when investors move in and bid up coin prices- then they sell and take their profits.

The most profitable period for the U.S. Rare Coin Market showed increases of 1,195% from December of 1975 through March of 1980. This market cycle parallels a time of high inflation in the U.S., rising gold prices, and a very weak economy- a market cycle that appears to be on the horizon ahead.

Other Rare Coin Market cycles since 1970 showed increases of 665% and 348%. Past performance is no guarantee of future value, but it is an indication of just how volatile and profitable collecting U.S. Rare Coins can be in uncertain economic climates when there’s a flight to safety from stocks to hard assets.

Why You Need To Buy and Sell Gold Coins (Part 4)

Throughout history, many coin collections have produced substantial long-term profits for their owners. This is particularly true for coin collectors of this century. Indeed, Harold Bareford reportedly purchased a collection of U.S. gold coins for $13,832 in the early 1950s which was resold at auction in 1978 for $1.2 million. A more substantial collector, Louis Eliasberg, built a collection that cost about $300,000. In 1982, it brought $12.4 million at auction.

This investment performance has been well documented by sources as diverse as The Wall Street Journal, Consumer Reports and a host of industry periodicals and guidesheets. What these reports have shown is that carefully selected portfolios of rare coins have had a high rate of long-term appreciation.

Of course, past performance is no guarantee of future results and investments in rare coins do involve risk. While the market performance of different coins varies substantially and no representation can be made that an individual investor’s portfolio will enjoy results similar to those that have been documented in the various independent reports and surveys, those reports and surveys illustrate the impressive returns that carefully selected rare U.S. coins can produce.

Tax Benefits

Capital gains on coins can only be taxed at liquidation, when the profits are actually realized. There is no taxation on phantom or undistributed profits as there are with some investments. And unlike most other investments, there is no federal income tax liability on so-called “wash sales” or like-kind exchanges which enable investors to trade their rare coins for other rare coins of equal or greater value

Intrinsic Value

Unlike paper investments, rare U.S. coins have real tangible value you can feel each time you hold one in your hand. Therefore, they offer two ways to build wealth. Carefully selected coins truly offer the best of bullion and numismatics in one investment. They contain the intrinsic security of bullion and can also offer extraordinary profit potential regardless of what precious metal spot prices do. Still, precious metal content is only a relatively small factor in determining the value of many rare U.S. coins whose value is almost solely based on condition, demand and rarity

Historically Significant Beauty

Rare U.S. coins are a part of our history–direct links to America’s rich heritage–as timeless and valuable as history itself. For two centuries, U.S. coins have been symbols of American stability, as well as reflections of national pride. Throughout our nation’s history, coins have spotlighted our national heroes, paid tribute to our great achievements and commemorated significant events. These truly historic works of art commemorate past sacrifices made in the name of freedom.

Rare U.S. coins acquaint investors with historical figures and events, no matter how far removed by time. The satisfaction of actually owning a piece of history from a bygone era makes investing in rare U.S. coins truly unique. Each coin has traveled a different path through history. As a result, each is a unique embodiment of the hopes and dreams of our founding fathers

Condition

The overwhelming majority of U.S. coins ever minted were circulated. Many coins were lost through attrition and others were damaged by use, thus eliminating any potential for numismatic value. The few surviving uncirculated coins are in a much more pristine condition.

Investment quality coins are primarily those coins rated in the 11 uncirculated grades, 60 and above, on the American Numismatic Association’s 70 point grading scale. A coin’s grade is a measure of its condition or state of preservation. The higher the grade, the better the condition.

Uncirculated coins fall into two broad categories: Proof (PF or PR) and Mint State (MS). Mint State coins were originally meant for circulation but never were circulated, so they remain in the same condition today as when they were minted. Proof coins were never meant for circulation, thus they received very careful handling and were specially struck at least twice on highly polished planchets.

The beauty of a coin can attract collectors as well as investors, and hence increase demand for a particular coin or set. This increased demand can result in rising values. Eye appeal is affected by several factors including the beauty of a coin’s design, the minting process used, the fullness and sharpness of its strike, the toning, the brilliance of its luster and the amount of wear and number of blemishes on the coin’s surface

Portfolios or Collections?

The age-old description of coin collecting as the “Hobby of Kings” is both accurate and misleading… accurate in conveying the outdated perception that coin collecting is restricted only to the very wealthy, misleading in that the number of collectors has steadily increased and has been estimated by the American Numismatic Association to include as many as 7-10 million coin buyers in the United States alone. Typically, the coin collector collects coins for their rarity and historical value. Collectors view their coins as rare art and as the tangible remnants of the cultural and economic forces that created them.

The investor begins from a different starting point–the fact that coins of proven rarity have shown remarkably high rates of appreciation. He sees the economic results of the pleasures of collecting and makes his original purchases with profits as his only motive.

However, we have found that the line between those of our clients that are collectors and those that are investors has become increasingly blurred. Collectors can’t help but be pleased when coins that they sell bring an attractive profit. Investors begin to see their coins as works of art and become knowledgeable about the circumstances of their minting and the era in which they were circulated.

Both collector and investor come to realize that their intellectual curiosity, aesthetic sensibilities and enjoyment in our country’s past can be used to create a collection that becomes an important store of value, a way to accumulate wealth that can be passed on to future generations–or used to fund their own retirements.
Why You Need To Buy and Sell Gold Coin (Part 5)

Grading coins

The condition of a coin is commonly summarized by a grade. Because the value of collectible coins often varies dramatically with grade and overly generous grading is not uncommon, reasonable grading proficiency is an important skill for collectors. The material presented here is intended only as an introduction to the subject. Grading is a skill that can only be developed over time through referrals to grading guides, consultation with experienced collectors and dealers, and lots of practice.

Published standards set objective criteria for grading, yet some amount of subjectivity is inevitable — even expert graders will often assign slightly different grades to the same coin. While you can often ask an experienced grader for an opinion, being able to make your own reasonable assessment of grade is your best protection.

An overview of American Numismatic Association standards follows. ANA standards are widely used in the U.S. but are not the only system used. Much of the rest of the world uses the grades Fair, Fine, Very Fine, Extremely Fine, Uncirculated and Fleur-de-coin.

Numerals used in coin grades have been taken from the Sheldon scale (see Glossary).

Uncirculated Coins

Coins with no wear at all are referred to as uncirculated or in mint state (MS). Grades from MS-60 to MS-70 in one point increments are used for mint state coins. Criteria include luster; the number, size and location of contact marks; the number, size and location of any hairlines, and the quality of the strike and overall eye appeal..

An MS-60 coin may have dull luster and numerous contact marks in prime focal areas, as long as there is no wear. To merit MS-65, a coin should have brilliant cartwheel luster (attractive toning is permissible), at most a few inconspicuous contact marks, no hairlines, and nearly complete striking details. Grades from MS-61 to MS-64 cover intermediate parts of this range. Truly exceptional coins may be graded MS-66, MS-67 or, if absolutely flawless, as high as the theoretical maximum of MS-70. Many numismatists consider MS-70 to be an unobtainable ideal.

Terms such as brilliant uncirculated (BU), choice BU, gem BU, select BU and premium BU are still used in lieu of numerical grades by some dealers, auctioneers and others. Correlations between these terms and the numeric MS grades are difficult at best, because of inconsistent usage and in some cases overgrading.

Market values for many uncirculated coins vary dramatically from one grade to the next. Remember that whether a coin is described with a numerical or an adjectival grade, it’s only someone’s opinion. Until you are comfortable with your ability to grade uncirculated coins, make liberal use of other opinions, such as those available with slabbed coins or from experienced collectors and dealers you trust, or concentrate on circulated coins.

Circulated Coins

For circulated coins the grade is primarily an indication of how much wear has occurred and generally does not take into account the presence or absence of dings, scratches, toning, dirt and other foreign substances (though such information may also be noted).

ANA grading standards recognize 11 grades for circulated coins (listed here with brief, generic descriptions):

AU-58, very choice about uncirculated: just traces of wear on a coin with nearly full luster and no major detracting contact marks

AU-55, choice about uncirculated: small traces of wear visible on the highest points

AU-50, about uncirculated: very light wear on the highest points; still has at least half of the original mint luster

EF-45 or XF-45, choice extremely fine: all design details are sharp; some mint luster remains, though perhaps only in “protected areas”

EF-40 or XF-40, extremely fine: slightly more wear than a “45”; traces of mint luster may show

VF-30, choice very fine: light even wear on high points, all lettering and design details are sharp

VF-20, very fine: most details are still well defined; high points are smooth

F-12, fine: major elements are still clear but details are worn away

VG-8, very good: major design elements, letters and numerals are worn but clear

G-4, good: major design elements are outlined but details are gone; for some series the date may not be sharp and the rim may not be complete.

AG-3, about good: heavily worn; date may be barely discernable While coins more worn than AG are rarely collected, two additional grades are nevertheless used to characterize them:

F-2, fair — very heavily worn; major portions may be completely smooth

P-1, poor, filler or cull — barely recognizable While not included in the ANA standards, intermediate grades like AU-53, VF-35, F-15 and G-6 are used by some dealers and grading services. When a grader believes a coin is better than the minimum requirements but not nice enough for the next higher grade “+” or “PQ” may be included (e.g. MS64PQ or VG+) or a range may be given (e.g. F-VF).

Split Grades

When there are significant differences between the obverse and reverse sides, a split grade may be assigned. Split grades are denoted with a “/”. For example, “F/VF” means that the obverse is F and the reverse is VF.

The overall grade is often determined by the obverse. An intermediate value may be appropriate when the difference is significant, especially if the reverse is lower. A coin graded MS-60/61 would be considered to have an overall grade of MS-60, and another at MS-65/63 could be considered to have an overall grade of MS-64.

About the Author

Steve is the CEO of cashcards-goldlynks rare/gold coin club. Check out his page at http://goldlynks.tripod.com. You can sign up for a free email course on buying and selling rare/gold coins for profit by sending email to goldcoinsinfo@yahoo.com. Membership to the coin club is free — to join: http://goldlynks.tripod.com